Sola Busca Ferrara XV (LS) | Review

In this TdM month, named Traditional Tarot with a Twist, I’ll review several TdM’s & Tarocchi’s, traditional reproductions or reinterpretations that can be recognized as both tarot and Marseille/Ancient Italian-like. However, their deviations and differences, might invite discussion on their pattern of ‘true’ TdM/Tarocchi-ness. Regardless, they are all unique and gorgeous in their own way. 1. Sola-Busca Ferrara by Lo Scarabeo | Anima Antiqua Series 2017 2. Eros: The Garden of Love Tarot: burlesque TdM by Uusi Studios 2017 3. Minchiate Florentine Etruria 1795 by Il Meneghello 1994 (+ Minchiate El Leone) 4. Le Tarot Noir: a medieval inspired TdM by Matthew Hackiere/Editions Vega 2013 *** [Editor’s note: Even though there is already a Sola Busca review- on the Mayer 1998 – on the site, this one also includes its historical significance and all the differences with other older and new tarot decks] The Sola-Busca is ‘hot’ at the moment. For whatever reason this very special 15th century deck is gaining repro-brothers*. This review is about the most recent addition to the Sola Busca stacks: Lo Scarabeo’s latest reproduction of the deck*. Enter Sola Busca Ferrara XV from their Anima Antiqua line. Look & Feel The Unboxing of Lo Scarabeo’s…

Le Tarot Noir | Review

there is more to the traditional tarot ‘branch’. It has more to offer and to love. Including the very new, the very old and some decks that simply deserve the name classic despite its age. This review revolves around the latter. Some brand it a TdM, others say not (the designer is part of the first group by the way). It is a little quirky, but according to yours truly also beautiful in its own way. I am talking about Le Tarot Noir. If you, like me, have been roaming the pages of th…

Great new historical tarot repro’s in Anima Antiqua | Interview

Traditional Tarot is ‘on the rise’*. Decks made in between the 15th and 19th century are being reproduced more and more by publishers and independent studios. If you have a thing for Ancient Italians and other old decks, you’re in for a real treat. Lo Scarabeo is soon to launch a new line of Tarocchi repro’s, upholding tradition. An interview about Anima Antiqua and ‘how it’s made’… –Andrea Chiarvesio -The Queen’s Sword   What does Anima Antiqua mean and how come you chose this title for the series? Anima Antiqua is latin for Ancient Soul and we feel the title embodies the mission behind this new line perfectly: bringing back decks from the past. Some of them well known, but some others almost unknown to parts of the tarot community. Does Lo Scarabeo (LS) feel responsible for keeping these traditional, Italian decks alive as the only mass market publisher with roots in the same country? We at LS have a great love, passion and respect for tarot. This includes, on the one hand, bringing innovation to tarot so that its very long life is vital and projected in the future, and on the other hand preserving the past wisdom. That…

Companion+ for Tarot of the Sevenfold Mystery

Place’s new book is a companion for the Sevenfold, the TdM and Hermeticism I own many of Robert Place’s decks (granted, I love most, but am not equally enthusiastic about all of them). Strangely enough that has not translated itself into even one review, but I am sure I’ll rectify that at one point.
 Besides his decks I’ve come to enjoy many of his writings and books. Combine those two and you have the reason for this little news-item. Because….Finally, it is here! Well, almost then. Place’s newest book is coming soon and it is one many of us Place-deck-collectors have been waiting for. Not only is he an artist with a very recognizable simple but elegant art-style, but he is also an extremely knowledgable art-historian and tarot historian. His book Tarot and History is a classic (on the pile of my standard tarot reference books) and the companion for the Alchemical Tarot (AT), Alchemy and the Tarot, is unequivocally one of the best deck companions ever written. But…if you are very much into his AT (ed4 or not), chances are you have the Tarot of the Sevenfold Mystery too. And as gorgeous as it is… most of us have…

Ariadne’s Thread | review | Minoan Tarot
Books , History & Culture , Mythology , Review , Tarot / 22 May 2017

A good tarot deck companion is a title that gets shared fast and easily. Simple because there are too many decks devoid of a (good) one. Most tarot readers have one: a deck so chockfull of symbolism linked to a specific theme or tradition, we need more than that LWB. And even the better (kit) companions sometimes still sorely miss information to understand certain depictions. We miss the creator’s research. The Minoan